Tagged: five stars

Review: The Compound by Robert Ford

TheCompound_dustjacket2Once again, Robert Ford has managed to write a story that kept me glued to the pages. Honestly, I couldn’t put the book down. After reading his first book, Samson and Denial, I eagerly awaited something else from this fantastic storyteller. With the release of his new novel, The Compound, I was not disappointed. His ability to describe a scene draws the reader in and doesn’t let go. Ford weaves three entirely different story lines into one seamless, action-filled adventure.

Jake, Ashley and Tori are an estranged family torn apart once again by the zombie apocalypse.

Calvin, a biker, wants nothing more than to spread his wife’s ashes where she requested and won’t let anything or anyone get in his way.

Sombre and Spider, brothers in a vicious gang, have benefitted from the zombie infestation by taking over the self-sustaining, super prison Tartarus.

Pick up your copy to find out what happens at Tartarus Federal Penitentiary aka The Compound.

I highly recommend this novel.

You can grab a copy of The Compound here.

***** Five out of Five Stars *****

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Review: White Picket Prisons by Kelli Owen

An eye for an eye… If this reigns true, I’m not sure what I owe author Kelli Owen for having created the amazing read, White Picket Prisons.

Cover by Alan M. Clark

Mark Baker is a good detective who’s growing tired of seeing the criminals he’s captured walk free either because of “technicalities” or good lawyering. Between his pregnant girlfriend, Gina and his (at times) frustrating job, his life is a roller coaster of emotions. When a strange letter arrives from Sarah, his sister who he hasn’t seen or heard from in nearly a decade, Mark’s finds himself investigating a mystery he may not even be able to solve.

Mark tracks the letter back to the tiny, Wisconsin village of Valley Mill. At first glance, the small town is everything Mark wants for his own city, content citizens and zero crime. After reuniting with his long lost sister, Mark learns more  about the little town and the citizens who inhabit Valley Mill. While everything seems perfect, almost too perfect, he soon finds out the reason why Sarah felt compelled to send him the letter… and everything changes.

***

Kelli Owen has once again managed to tell a story which will keep the reader turning the page right up until the very end.

Owen doesn’t need to unnecessary blood and guts to get her point across but instead she excels at quiet and subtle creepiness throughout the book.

Her ability to describe the scenery and the situations the characters find themselves in, helps pull the reader into the spooky little town and stands them at the gazebo, right beside the rest of the Valley Mill odd citizens.

Owen’s character development is very strong which allows the reader to feel the full spectrum of emotions her characters are dealing with in the book, as they encounter new situations.

White Picket Prisons ends unexpectedly, leaving the reader satisfied with the outcome, but also wanting more at the same time.
Few authors can succeed at this type of ending, but Owen nails it.

5 Stars out of 5

*** White Picket Prisons is recommended as Mandytory reading***